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20110701
20110731
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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
to it is the corruption allegations at scotland yard, the police agency. we're starting today's testimony with the police. >> reporter: that's right. two of the top cops in the country, former metropolitan police commissioner already resigned and then john yates in charge of the phone hacking investigation review he too resigned yesterday. this is how far the scandal has gone. it cast a shadow over scotland yard and everyone now especially lawmakers are trying to get to the bottom of just how much corruption was there, how cozy was the relationship between news of the world and scotland yard. >> it's going to have implications for david cameron's government. andy coleson is being alleged to have known about this when he was heading up the newspaper. >> reporter: this goes to show how it goes to the very hard of politics here basically andy was the chief spin doctor for prime minister david cameron so this is a major embarrassment for him and it's so bad that he's coming back to england early from his trip to south africa specifically to address these phone hacking allegations at a special day of parliame
scotland yard's handling of the investigation. his assistant also resigned. stephanie gosk is following the latest developments from london for us. >> reporter: richard, in the last 24 hours, there have been two high-level resignations from scotland yard and colluding the police chief himself, sir paul stevenson, he has resigned because he hired in 2009 a former editor of "news of the world." his deputy, john yates, has resigned after he was informed that he would be suspended while an investigation into scotland yard's investigation of the scandal was being conducted. john yates is being criticized for in 2009 not continuing to pursue an investigation into the phone hacking. all of this comes while their department continues to make arrests. on sunday they arrested rebekah brooks, i high-level trusted executive of rupert murdoch. her lawyer today said that this arrest took her by surprise, that she is not -- that she says she is not guilty of any criminal wrongdoing and that they held her for nine hours yesterday without presenting her with formal allegations or with actual evidence of
minister say whether this inquiry does extend to scotland? does include the issues such as policing which has devolved in scotland and the scotland's first minister for that and in that context has he secured an assurance from an uncharacteristic required first minister about his contact with news international? >> i can confirm this inquiry does extend to scotland. as i said we did send the draft terms of reference to get the administrations. we were able to accept a number of points. there was one specific point that the scottish administration wanted dealt with, which concerned the information commissioners' report which we haven't put specifically into the terms but, of course, it will be dealt with by the inquiry because it's such an important part of the work. more generally speaking, when it comes to the relationship between politicians and media, this inquiry will be able to go where the evidence leads. >> lee scott. >> does my right honorable friend agree with that welfare allegations in the metropolitan police have a vast majority of hundreds of police officers are protecting us
on this issue, and of course, scotland yard has been tainted by this with the top cops in the country now resigning. people are wondering just how far does this scandal, does the corruption go? >> okay, atia shubert joining us live from westminster, many thanks for that, atika will also be on the show later on to give us more insight into what we can expect and what the consequences of what's going to be said today will be. manisha? >> also nina you mentioned earlier how the stock price has been affected. we've been tracking the slump in news corp stock in the wake of the hacking allegations. news corp shares actually closed up by just over 2.5%. in australia today, that reprieve coming after a two-year low on monday and as bloomberg reports that news corp is considering replacing rupert murdoch with coo chase caray. the company dismissed speculation that murdoch may step down. as for news corp's u.s. shares they sank to a six-month low monday dropping another 5% and the company's loss more than $8 billion in market value in the past two weeks alone. july 5th, which was when those allegat
to scotland, too? does include the issues such as policing that have evolved in scotland? >> it does extend it to scotland. we were able to accept a number of points. there was one specific point that the scottish administration wanted dealt with. it concerned the information commissioner's report. it will be dealt with by the inquiry because it is such an important part of the work. when it comes to the relationship between politicians and media, this inquiry will be able to go where the evidence leads. >> there were allegations against some offices and the metropolitan police. protecting us and doing a wonderful job and should not be smeared by this? >> that's an incredibly important point police officers put their lives on the line for us every single day. and while, of course, we have to get to the bottom of what went wrong in the met, we shouldn't allow that to undermine the public confidence the people have in the bobby on the beat and the fantastic job they do for us. >> mr. richard burton. >> in response from the question from my right honorable friend, the prime minister said if he
of britain's top cop, the man in charge of scotland yard. sir paul stephenson says he did nothing wrong but regrets the criticism that his police failed to do enough. >> however the issue of my integrity is different. let me state clearly, i, and the people who know me, know that my integrity is completely intact. i may wish we had done some things differently, but i will not lose any sleep over my personal integrity. >> let's get the latest now from london and cnn's dan rivers. >> reporter: kyra, another scalp has been claimed by this ever-growing scandal. the most senior policemen in britain, sir paul stephenson, has resigned. meanwhile, the former chief executive of news international, of rupert murdoch's paper, rebecca brooks, was taken in for questioning, detained some 12 hours sunday night and released just after midnight. there was speculation that would have meant that she wouldn't have turned up on tuesday afternoon, london time, to be grilled by politicians. but we're being told by her spokesman that she will be there. she won't appear together with james and rupert murdoch. s
for questioning and found herself under arrest. hours later, britain's top police officer, the chief of scotland yard resigned, and he acknowledges that the investigation was inadequate, and steven yates now announcing his resignation. the scandal has been growing steadily after reports that there was a hacking of an answering machine by "news of the world." tomorrow murdoch and his son james are scheduled to appear on a hearing in parliament. cnn will bring you that testimony live. dan rivers is inla london. rebekah brooks is expected to testify tomorrow, and now what are the plans in terms of questioning her tomorrow? >> reporter: well, politicians will have to be careful how they frame the questions to her. in britain, if there is a pending trial or the possibility of a pending trial, you have to be very careful what kind of news coverage is gained from that, because they don't want to prejudge the trial here. they don't want to sway a potential juror one way or the other. and this testimony from rebekah brooks will be broadcast live not only here but around the world. they have to be fairly
". this is almost an hour. >> tonight scotland yard in turmoil. another resignation of the top. police biggest casualty of the phone-hacking scandal. assistant commissioner john yates follow his boss's example quits more in anger than in sorrow. >> there continues to be a huge amount of inaccurate, ill-informed and on occasion down right malicious gossip being published about me personally. >> another bizarre twist tonight. sean hoare the initial "news of the world" whistle blower is found dead. david cameron cuts short of visit to africa. >> i'm determined to get to the bottom of it. >> tonight we examine the damage he is suffering and the state of the met. then we'll talk about that committee hearing with rupert murdoch tomorrow. also tonight the united states prepared last month their drones have stopped killing pakistani civilians. we have news evidence which says that's wrong. good evening is britain's biggest and most important police force merely inexcept or corrupt or possibly both? you can forgive people for wondering. public confidence in the police is said to be rocking after two hi
's a reality, isn't it? it's reality, if you look at it. they figured out how to wire scotland yard and parliament and 10 downing street. rupert murdock has been for some time, the most powerful man in britain. >> when you see this frail man yesterday objectly incapable of following the facts, unable to remember the names and certain facts, well, i'm afraid there was something on the part of journalists. they know him to be aggressive, particular, specific. remember, i was mentioning earlier in piers morgan's diaries, he worked for rupert murdock for 18 months and he rang him every week of every month for 18 months. >> martin -- >> yes he says he knew nothing. >> are you surprised more questions haven't been raised about the passage from peer morgan's book where he talks about phone hacking and brags about how you can do it? >> no, i'm not surprised. he doesn't say he does it. what he says in the book, if you read it carefully, this is important. he said, he heard about this phenomena and he therefore personally changed his own cell phone numbers in order to prevent that from happen
with scotland yard. >> the news international letters demonstrates that they are cooperating with police inquiries, and have evidence and there was evidence they were cooperating because they were providing. unless you contrary evidence that they were deliberately obstructing you in anyway, you cannot get a production lawyer. there's lawyers at this table i know who will reiterate that. you cannot get evidence, and i'm one of them. >> the reality is you are seeking to blame the legal process for something that is actually the metropolitan police fault, isn't? >> completely disagree with your. >> can i ask you this quick do you know who first recommended mr. wallis to mr. fedorcio? >> i don't know that. >> you didn't make inquiries about that when you were asked? [inaudible] >> did you make inquiries about mr. wallis? wallis? at all from a mr. fedorcio? deana who recommended him speakers i do not recall how it came in this process in terms of who else on the list was responsible for producing the tendering process. i'm sure he said that. i was aware, presumably before 31st of august, 29,
were bought and sold. scotland yard got testy today claiming people were trying to leak allegations that the "news of the world" tried to get phone numbers to members of the royal family by bribing police officer. richard watson now from the police. >> once again the ethics which should underpin the relationship between police and journalists is under scrutiny. as never before. when it works, cops need publicity to help them investigate. but a sort of allegations in recent days shows the darker side. >> any journalist work is sold -- sensitive information. that's what excludes them. but clearly there is a line that can't be crossed, and today's news as a member of the royal protection squad has allegedly passed on information for return for cash to come is yet another profound shock. >> personal protection officers travel in the same car as the royals. close protection officers in backup vehicles. others guard buildings. the bbc was told today that the notion of the "news of the world" former royal editor asked his editor who went on to work for the p.m. for 1000 pounds to be paid t
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)